Malawi sitting on plenty of minerals

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Data from the recent World Bank geological survey has revealed plenty of potential mineral deposits which government hopes will boost the country’s economy.

Director of geological survey department Jalf Salima said the data shows there are deposits below the surface that “demands follow-up work”.

Salima said Government will interpret all the survey based data while the private sector’s responsibility is to interpret data in their areas of interest to help them focus on their exploration efforts.

Mulanje MT

Minerals in Malawi.

He further said the formations they have discovered are also found in neighbouring countries and gave an example of Kasungu Dyke which has similar qualities with that of the great Dyke in Zimbabwe which has a number of important metals.

The results, which comes at the end of a year-long survey co-financed by the World Bank and European Union through the Bank’s mining governance and growth support project, has seen high-resolution data being produced that provides insight into the country’s mineral potential which is to be explored for potential sites.

World Bank country manager for Malawi Laura Kullenberg has since urged government to understand the concepts of mining and development of resource wealth because if they do not get it right there could be conflict.

“The completion of this survey is a key achievement for Malawi especially if the detailed interpretation brings about positive results critical for the mining sector to help boost the economic growth that this country needs,” said Kullenberg

Minister of natural resources, energy and mining Bright Msaka commended the work of World Bank and EU in boosting the country’s mining sector and added that Malawians are the principal beneficiaries of Malawi’s mining wealth.

“If this data is properly utilised it will help the country realise a modern mining sector therefore Malawians will no longer be poor,” said the minister.

Meanwhile Malawi government has applied for the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative candidature to ensure transparency and accountability in managing mineral revenue.

 

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28 Comments

  1. There was always an unfinished debate about the geographical position of Malawi. Why does it happen that all its neighbours have mineral deposits except Malawi herself? it made n makes no sense, now think of all that deposit if it were to b mined millions of years later, that Is now? Kamuzu had a vision for agriculture and according to the times he was in, it was a good economic move but now times have changed the ground isn’t producing even enuf for our families even the lake, fish population has gone down to the point of being unsustainable, why don’t we go for the obvious; mining. yes we have crooked politicians and greedy cooperates just waiting for that tap to open but it doesn’t mean 100% will end up in their pockets. the recent move by govt to research in2 medical marujuan production has given us hope, why not we explore all areas of our strength. all we need in Malawi is a patriot some one who is gonna have the nation @heart and @the same time be visionary like Banda and Bingu wa munthalika (during his first term only)

  2. Will boost the country’s economy? Only if the mines are state owned. Its not proper to make decisions based on lies. State owned mines eventually get privatised and the ownership is lost to international cooporations. Kamuzu did not value mining but Malawi was in a better shape economically.

  3. We wont see any change. The money will go into our gov. Pocket. They couldn’t care less about the people. That is an african government.

  4. Yes but our leaders too much beaurocracy and corruption samples are vbveing taken tons and tons for verification for ten yyears but we have never hElD that now the mines have started operating its only kayerekera

  5. Even if these minerals are escavated, we already know our government, the money will probably end up enriching themselves. I dont even understand why you have to be so greedy….